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By David S. Barnes

During this first English-language research of well known and clinical responses to tuberculosis in nineteenth-century France, David Barnes presents a much-needed old point of view on a affliction that's making an alarming comeback within the usa and Europe. Barnes argues that French perceptions of the disease--ranging from the early romantic picture of a consumptive lady to the later view of a virus unfold via the poor--owed extra to the ability buildings of nineteenth-century society than to scientific technology. by way of 1900, the struggle opposed to tuberculosis had turn into a battle opposed to the soiled behavior of the operating class.Lucid and unique, Barnes's examine broadens our figuring out of the way and why societies assign ethical meanings to lethal illnesses.

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Jérôme Renaud of the Service des Archives, Assistance publique de Paris, graciously facilitated access to hospital records and other holdings. My research benefited from many helpful strategic discussions with, among others, Patrick Fridenson, Alain Corbin, Olivier Faure, Pierre Guillaume, Bernard-Pierre Lécuyer, Alain Cottereau, Lion Murard, and Patrick Zylberman. Allan Mitchell was generous with source material and drafts of his own work and cordially agreed to disagree with me on certain matters of interpretation.

Nonpulmonary forms of tuberculosis can also be acquired by ingesting milk or meat from infected cows. This form of transmission was the object of a certain amount of concern in the nineteenth century, before widespread pasteurization of milk and regulation of meat supplies, but it was always perceived as a minor danger compared to inhalation. 7 (Pulmonary tuberculosis is by far the most common form of the disease. " Most of them share another closely related trait: poverty, with all of its concomitant physical effects.

This form of transmission was the object of a certain amount of concern in the nineteenth century, before widespread pasteurization of milk and regulation of meat supplies, but it was always perceived as a minor danger compared to inhalation. 7 (Pulmonary tuberculosis is by far the most common form of the disease. " Most of them share another closely related trait: poverty, with all of its concomitant physical effects. This present-day epidemiology, so divergent at first glance from the observed and re- Page 4 ported incidence of tuberculosis in nineteenth-century societies, may at least provide some questions (if not answers) with which to address the historical dimension of tuberculosis.

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